"Parson Weems’ Fable," by Grant Wood. The trees!

"Parson Weems’ Fable," by Grant Wood. The trees!

0 notes

via fuckyeahvintageillustration: Julius Klinger poster for Tabu cigarette paper.

via fuckyeahvintageillustration: Julius Klinger poster for Tabu cigarette paper.

0 notes

How did I waste this evening? In a vodka martini, Feldeinsamkeit, long-neglected exercises for the inner thigh, and stumbling through a book of Geoffrey Hill, ordered long ago, that just arrived, in which I discovered this bit:

A Cloud in Aquila

1
Get him out of there — Turing, out of
the Turing Machine. Some hope, if the rules
of immortality can be bent. I
should hope so.

2
The world of his prediction is not ours
as he conceived it. If there is innocence
it was as here: phase, segment; region
of Aquila

3
that validates and haunts first love, verifies
disappointment itself, meaningless
in the absence of spirit, whatever
the mechanism

4
of the thing, desire, the singing calculus;
impossible pseudo-science, Eddington,
McTaggart: their measure of the mind
nubilate, precise,

5
roving existence at call. Any way
the idea of love is what joins us thus far
though not past all question in the same
tissue of body;

6
and Morcom is well dead and Turing with him;
the Clock House demolished. At the sharp turn
where it was always dark the road steepens
to Housman’s Pisgah.

————————————————-

Mir ist, als ob ich längst gestorben bin.

0 notes

""Ne m’est-ce pas une sotte humeur, de disconvenir avec un milier à qui ma fortune me joint, de qui je ne me puis passer, pour me tenir à un ou deux, qui sont hors de mon commerce : ou plustost à un desir fantastique, de chose que je ne puis recouvrer?"

- Michel de Montaigne, “De Trois Commerces,” Essais"

"Is it not a stupid humor of mine to be out of tune with a thousand to whom I am joined by fortune, whom I cannot do without, only to cling to one or two, who are not associated with me, or rather to a fantastic desire for something I cannot recapture?"

- Michel de Montaigne, “Of Three Kinds of Association,” Essays (Donald Frame, trans.)

(Source: thesobsister)

5 notes

James McMullan, from The Secret History of Homoerotic Illustration.

James McMullan, from The Secret History of Homoerotic Illustration.

1 note

[skip ahead to 36:55 for the fifth movement.]

I had a mad Rumanian piano teacher who believed that musicianship died somewhere between Artur Schnabel’s 1930’s recordings of the Beethoven Sonatas and the detestable clockwork of the Second World War. Indeed, he proved his dedication to the pleasures of old world aestheticism when he was drafted into the military, by pulling the pin on a hand grenade and forgetting to throw the crude mechanical device — and thus did he come to be released from Ceaușescu’s army in the days before such things were even possible. I am of coarser stuff and take the world less delicately — but what tender delicacies some of these old recordings offer! The precision may be lacking in places, but they that want a Prussian style can look elsewhere for their vitis and fustuarium. I hear something fragile and almost neurasthenic in the nearly-off-the-rails rubato in this Budapest Quartet recording of the fifth movement of Beethoven’s Opus 132 — something breathing, wounded, and alive

Gene Pitney, “Town Without Pity”.

0 notes

Warpaint, “Love is to Die.”

Got it all hooked up. This could only go one way.

0 notes

2 Unlimited, “No Limit.”

0 notes

Duruflé, “Ubi Caritas”. With the FiiO, the Dragonfly DAC, and the Senns, the whole ceiling opens up.

8 notes